Program

Doctoral Program in Economics. (International Program)

Overview

The Doctoral Program in Economics (International Program) launched in 2004 is the most advanced degree offered under a supervision of the School of Development Economics. The objective of the program is to prepare candidates for careers in university teaching and research in economics, and for nonacademic positions requiring advanced research and analytical capabilities. A perfect combination of course work and research in the program has made us one of the most sought after programs in Thailand. The program has widely been interested by the public and private sector.

Philosophy

Our Doctor of Philosophy Program in Economics is designed to equip graduates with the advanced knowledge and analytical skills necessary for economic research, and these skills will lead to informed economic policy, planning, and management decisions on both the theoretical and practical levels. As our program possesses an international focus, we spend every effort to guarantee an in-depth investigation of state-of-the-art economic research while at the same time providing opportunities for students to make appropriate applications to ongoing development agenda-not only in Thailand and Southeast Asia but also globally.

For us, a broad education in economics encompasses both theoretical knowledge and practical application. Without the former, practical application becomes weakened and ineffective, and without the latter, theoretical understanding remains isolated and out of touch with the real world. Consequently, we believe that, with the theoretical training and respectful dialogue with our faculty that we provide, our students will develop the skills necessary to make practical and concrete contributions to economic development in Thailand and in the global arena.

“We make contributions to economic development in Thailand
and in neighboring Asian Countries”

Among the many benefits of our program, paramount is the inculcation in students of a solid foundation in advanced microeconomics, macroeconomics, and econometrics – skills necessary for professional-quality research in economics that is competitive on an international level. We also focus on providing detailed exposure to many development areas, such as public economics, development economics, financial economics, international economics, labor economics and human capital, and environmental economics. The close interaction of our students and faculty provides a forum for the sharpening of research questions that will engage students in the complexity of the issues surrounding global economic theory today. Our aim is for our Ph.D. graduates to produce Ph.D. dissertations of high value that will make the greatest impact to the course of economic development.

Expected Learning Outcomes

LO1: Use economic theory and research methodology to construct economic model and evaluate economic policy.
LO2: Engage in lifelong learning and keep up with the economic research frontier.
LO3: Excel in academic research and policy analysis.
LO4: Maintain research ethics and social responsibility.
LO5: Communicate effectively.

Course Objective

To produce graduates with abilities  to conduct research in economics with academic excellence, to apply economic theories in decision-making, implementing economic policies, planning and management, as well as to create human resources with knowledge to contribute to the country’s development.

Qualification of Applicants:

Plan 2 (2.1):  Coursework 30 credits and Dissertation 36 credits, a total of 66 credits
Applicants must hold a Master’s Degree in any field or equivalent from an institution accredited by the following: the Commission on Higher Education, the Office of the Civil Service Commission or the standard organizations is require or by approval of the Council of the institute.

Plan 2 (2.2):  Coursework 42 credits and Dissertation 48 credits, a total of 90 credits
Applicants must hold a Bachelor’s Degree or equivalent from an institution accredited by the following: the Commission on Higher Education, the Office of the Civil Service Commission or the standard organizations is require or by approval of the Council of the institute and the must obtain the bachelor’s degree with first class honors or have GPA. not less than 3.50.

Plan 1 (1.1):  Focuses on research, no requirement for courses, a total of 48 credits
Applicants must hold a Master’s Degree in any field from an accredited academic institution. Considerations will be made upon the applicants’ scholastic records, experiences, and dissertation proposals.

Consideration for applicants will be made based upon the applicant’s scholastic records, statement of purpose and English language proficiency and interview.

Program Structure

Courses “Plan 1 (1.1)
Focuses on research, no requirement for courses” “Plan 2 (2.1)
Research and courses requirements” “Plan 2 (2.2)
Research and courses requirements”
Pre-Foundation Courses “6 credits
(Non credit)” “6 credits
(Non credit)” “6 credits
(Non credit)”
Basic Courses “3 credits
(Non credit)” “3 credits
(Non credit)” 12 credits
Core Courses – 18 credits 18 credits
Elective Courses – 12 credits 12 credits
Dissertation 48 credits 36 credits 48 credits
Qualifying Examination Required Required Required
Total 48 Credits 66 Credits 90 Credits

Courses List

Plan 1 (1.1)
The formal course requirements for Plan 1 (1.1). This course focuses on research only with a total of 48 credits. No credit earned in DE 7000 Mathematics for Economists may be applied toward the Ph.D. degree.

LC 4003 Advanced Integrated English Language Skills Development 3 Credits
LC 4012 Remedial Integrated English Language Skills Development 3 Credits
LC 6000 Advanced Reading and Writing in English for Graduate Studies 3 Credits
LC 6001 Remedial Advanced Reading and Writing in English for Graduate Studies 3 Credits

Pre-Foundation Courses (Non credit)
Students who do not meet the minimum requirements of English proficiency tests stipulated by the program must enroll in the English for graduate studies program and receive a grade not lower than “B” within the following periods:

Remark: Exemption of enrollment to English for graduate studies courses are determined in compliance with the criteria and requirements stipulated in the English for graduate studies program by the Graduate School of Language and Communication, National Institute of Development Administration.

Basic Course (Non credit)
DE 7000 Mathematics for Economists 3 Credits
This is a required course for all doctoral students in the program. To be exempted from the course, students must petition for the permission from the School Dean.
Dissertation (48 Credits)
DE 9900 Dissertation 48 Credits
Remark: The thesis defense’s criterion is accordance with the National Institute of Development Administration academic regulations B.E. 2557 (2014) and it’s revised, and the standard graduate studies criteria B.E. 2015.

Plan 2 (2.1)
The formal course requirements for Plan 2 (2.1) must be met with 66 credits. No credit earned in DE 7000 Mathematics for Economists may be applied toward the Ph.D. degree.

Pre-Foundation Courses (Non credit)
Students who do not meet the minimum requirements of English proficiency tests stipulated by the program must enroll in the English for graduate studies program and receive a grade not lower than “B” within the following periods:
LC 4003 Advanced Integrated English Language Skills 3 Credits
Development
LC 4012 Remedial Integrated English Language Skills 3 Credits
Development
LC 6000 Advanced Reading and Writing in English 3 Credits
for Graduate Studies
LC 6001 Remedial Advanced Reading and Writing 3 Credits
in English for Graduate Studies

Remark: Exemption of enrollment to English for graduate studies courses are determined in compliance with the criteria and requirements stipulated in the English for graduate studies program by the Graduate School of Language and Communication, National Institute of Development Administration.

Basic Course (Non credit)
DE 7000 Mathematics for Economists 3 Credits
This is a required course for all doctoral students in the program. To be exempted from the course, students must petition for the permission from the School Dean.

Core Courses (18 Credits)
DE 8100 Microeconomic Theory I 3 Credits
DE 8200 Microeconomic Theory II 3 Credits
DE 8300 Macroeconomic Theory I 3 Credits
DE 8400 Macroeconomic Theory II 3 Credits
DE 8500 Econometrics I 3 Credits
DE 8600 Econometrics II 3 Credits

Elective Courses (12 Credits)
Students must choose four Ph.D.-level courses in economics or related to their area of specialization as electives under the guidance of advisor.
DE 9000 Development Economics: Microeconomic Issues 3 Credits
DE 9001 Development Economics: Macroeconomic Issues 3 Credits
DE 9002 International Trade 3 Credits
DE 9003 International Finance 3 Credits
DE 9004 Financial Economics 3 Credits
DE 9005 Asset Pricing Theory 3 Credits
DE 9006 Natural Resources and Environmental Economics 3 Credits
DE 9007 Environmental Valuation 3 Credits
DE 9008 Taxation and Welfare Economics 3 Credits
DE 9009 Government Expenditure and Public Policy 3 Credits
DE 9010 Behavioral Economics 3 Credits
DE 9011 Quantitative Tools for Economic Analysis 3 Credits
DE 9012 Economic Approach to Policy Analysis 3 Credits
DE 9013 Labor Economics 3 Credits
DE 9014 Health Economics 3 Credits
DE 9015 Game Theory 3 Credits
DE 9016 Independent Research Paper 3 Credits
DE 9017 Directed Study 3 Credits
Remark: Schedule of elective courses are subject to approval of the school of Development Economics.

Dissertation (36 Credits)
DE 9900 Dissertation 36 Credits
Remark: The thesis defense’s criterion is accordance with the National Institute of Development Administration academic regulations B.E. 2557 (2014) and it’s revised, and the standard graduate studies criteria B.E. 2015.

Plan 2 (2.2)
The formal course requirements for Plan 2 (2.2) must be met with 90 credits.

Pre-Foundation Courses (Non credit)
Students who do not meet the minimum requirements of English proficiency tests stipulated by the program must enroll in the English for graduate studies program and receive a grade not lower than “B” within the following periods:
LC 4003 Advanced Integrated English Language Skills 3 Credits
Development
LC 4012 Remedial Integrated English Language Skills 3 Credits
Development
LC 6000 Advanced Reading and Writing in English 3 Credits
for Graduate Studies
LC 6001 Remedial Advanced Reading and Writing 3 Credits
in English for Graduate Studies
Remark: Exemption of enrollment to English for graduate studies courses are determined in compliance with the criteria and requirements stipulated in the English for graduate studies program by the Graduate School of Language and Communication, National Institute of Development Administration.

Basic Course (12 Credits)
DE 6001 Intermediate Microeconomics 3 Credits
DE 6002 Intermediate Macroeconomics 3 Credits
DE 6003 Basic Econometrics 3 Credits)
DE 7000 Mathematics for Economists 3 Credits

Core Courses (18 Credits)
DE 8100 Microeconomic Theory I 3 Credits
DE 8200 Microeconomic Theory II 3 Credits
DE 8300 Macroeconomic Theory I 3 Credits
DE 8400 Macroeconomic Theory II 3 Credits
DE 8500 Econometrics I 3 Credits DE 8600 Econometrics II 3 Credits

Elective Courses (12 Credits)
Students must choose four Ph.D.-level courses in economics or related to their area of specialization as electives under the guidance of advisor.
DE 9000 Development Economics: Microeconomic Issues 3 Credits
DE 9001 Development Economics: Macroeconomic Issues 3 Credits
DE 9002 International Trade 3 Credits
DE 9003 International Finance 3 Credits
DE 9004 Financial Economics 3 Credits
DE 9005 Asset Pricing Theory 3 Credits
DE 9006 Natural Resources and Environmental Economics 3 Credits DE 9007 Environmental Valuation 3 Credits
DE 9008 Taxation and Welfare Economics 3 Credits
DE 9009 Government Expenditure and Public Policy 3 Credits
DE 9010 Behavioral Economics 3 Credits
DE 9011 Quantitative Tools for Economic Analysis 3 Credits
DE 9012 Economic Approach to Policy Analysis 3 Credits
DE 9013 Labor Economics 3 Credits
DE 9014 Health Economics 3 Credits
DE 9015 Game Theory 3 Credits
DE 9016 Independent Research Paper 3 Credits
DE 9017 Directed Study 3 Credits
Remark: schedule of elective courses are subject to approval of the school of Development Economics.

Dissertation (48 Credits)
DE 9900 Dissertation 48 Credits
Remark: The thesis defense’s criterion is accordance with the National Institute of Development Administration academic regulations B.E. 2557 (2014) and it’s revised, and the standard graduate studies criteria B.E. 2015.

Master of Economics
This alternative set of requirements for the Master’s Degree must be met with 36 credits if students change their plans or fail to satisfy the Ph.D. requirements.

Pre-Foundation Courses (Non credit)
Students who do not meet the minimum requirements of English proficiency tests stipulated by the program must enroll in the English for graduate studies program and receive a grade not lower than “B” within the following periods:
LC 4003 Advanced Integrated English Language Skills 3 Credits
Development
LC 4012 Remedial Integrated English Language Skills 3 Credits
Development
LC 6000 Advanced Reading and Writing in English 3 Credits
for Graduate Studies
LC 6001 Remedial Advanced Reading and Writing 3 Credits
in English for Graduate Studies
Remark: Exemption of enrollment to English for graduate studies courses are determined in compliance with the criteria and requirements stipulated in the English for graduate studies program by the Graduate School of Language and Communication, National Institute of Development Administration.

Basic Courses (12 Credits)
DE 6001 Intermediate Microeconomics 3 Credits
DE 6002 Intermediate Macroeconomics 3 Credits
DE 6003 Basic Econometrics 3 Credits
DE 7000 Mathematics for Economists 3 Credits

Core Courses (9 Credits)
DE 8100 Microeconomic Theory I 3 Credits
DE 8300 Macroeconomic Theory I 3 Credits
DE 8500 Econometrics I 3 Credits

Elective Courses (12 Credits)
Students shall choose any course from elective courses under the guidance of advisor to complete the requirement.
DE 8xxx/9xxx Elective Course (#1) 3 Credits
DE 8xxx/9xxx Elective Course (#2) 3 Credits
DE 8xxx/9xxx Elective Course (#3) 3 Credits
DE 8xxx/9xxx Elective Course (#4) 3 Credits

Independent Studies (3 Credits)
DE 8900 Independent Studies 3 Credits

Study Plan

A typical program of a Ph.D. student consists of the following sequence:

Plan 1 (1.1) Dissertation only no requirement for courses
First Summer (8 weeks)
DE 7000 Mathematics for Economists Non credit
First Year, 1st Semester
LC 6000 Advanced Reading and Writing in English 3 Credits
for Graduate Studies (Non credit)
DE 9900 Dissertation 6 Credits
First Year, 2nd Semester
LC 4003 Advanced Integrated English Language Skills 3 Credits
Development (Non credit)
DE 9900 Dissertation 6 Credits
Following Semesters
DE 9900 Dissertation 36 Credits

Plan 2 (2.1) Dissertation and course requirements
First Summer (8 weeks)
DE 7000 Mathematics for Economists Non credit
First Year, 1st Semester
LC 6000 Advanced Reading and Writing in English 3 Credits
for Graduate Studies (Non credit)
DE 8100 Microeconomic Theory I 3 Credits
DE 8300 Macroeconomic Theory I 3 Credits
DE 8500 Econometrics I 3 Credits
First Year, 2nd Semester
LC 4003 Advanced Integrated English Language Skills 3 Credits
Development (Non credit)
DE 8200 Microeconomic Theory II 3 Credits
DE 8400 Macroeconomic Theory II 3 Credits
DE 8600 Econometrics II 3 Credits
Second Year, 1st Semester
DE 9xxx Elective Course (#1) 3 Credits
DE 9xxx Elective Course (#2) 3 Credits
Second Year, 2nd Semester
DE 9xxx Elective Course (#3) 3 Credits
DE 9xxx Elective Course (#4) 3 Credits
Third Year, 1st Semester
DE 9900 Dissertation 6 Credits
Third Year, 2nd Semester
DE 9900 Dissertation 12 Credits
Fourth Year, 1st Semester
DE 9900 Dissertation 12 Credits
Fourth Year, 2nd Semester
DE 9900 Dissertation 6 Credits

Plan 2 (2.2) Dissertation and course requirements
First Summer (16 weeks)
DE 6001 Intermediate Microeconomics 3 Credits
DE 6002 Intermediate Macroeconomics 3 Credits DE 6003 Basic Econometrics 3 Credits
DE 7000 Mathematics for Economists 3 Credits
First Year, 1st Semester
LC 6000 Advanced Reading and Writing in English 3 Credits
for Graduate Studies (Non credit)
DE 8100 Microeconomic Theory I 3 Credits
DE 8300 Macroeconomic Theory I 3 Credits
DE 8500 Econometrics I 3 Credits
First Year, 2nd Semester
LC 4003 Advanced Integrated English Language Skills 3 Credits
Development (Non credit)
DE 8200 Microeconomic Theory II 3 Credits
DE 8400 Macroeconomic Theory II 3 Credits
DE 8600 Econometrics II 3 Credits
Second Year, 1st Semester
DE 9xxx Elective Course (#1) 3 Credits
DE 9xxx Elective Course (#2) 3 Credits
Second Year, 2nd Semester
DE 9xxx Elective Course (#3) 3 Credits
DE 9xxx Elective Course (#4) 3 Credits
Third Year, 1st Semester
DE 9900 Dissertation 6 Credits
Third Year, 2nd Semester
DE 9900 Dissertation 12 Credits
Fourth Year, 1st Semester
DE 9900 Dissertation 12 Credits
Fourth Year, 2nd Semester
DE 9900 Dissertation 12 Credits
Fifth Year, 1st Semester
DE 9900 Dissertation 6 Credits

There is an alternative set of requirements that can be used for the Master’s Degree if students change their plans or fail to satisfy the Ph.D. requirements:
Master of Economics
First Summer (16 weeks)
DE 6001 Intermediate Microeconomics 3 Credits
DE 6002 Intermediate Macroeconomics 3 Credits DE 6003 Basic Econometrics 3 Credits
DE 7000 Mathematics for Economists 3 Credits
First Year, 1st Semester
LC 6000 Advanced Reading and Writing in English 3 Credits
for Graduate Studies (Non credit)
DE 8100 Microeconomic Theory I 3 Credits
DE 8300 Macroeconomic Theory I 3 Credits
DE 8500 Econometrics I 3 Credits
First Year, 2nd Semester
LC 4003 Advanced Integrated English Language Skills 3 Credits
Development (Non credit)
DE 8xxx/9xxx Elective Course (#1) 3 Credits
DE 8xxx/9xxx Elective Course (#2) 3 Credits
Second Year, 1st Semester
DE 8xxx/9xxx Elective Course (#3) 3 Credits
DE 8xxx/9xxx Elective Course (#4) 3 Credits
DE 8900 Independent Studies 3 Credits

Course Description

Pre-Foundation Courses
Plan 1 (1.1), Plan 2 (2.1) and Plan 2 (2.2)

Review of essential reading and writing strategies required to read and write academic English. Course contents include work on sentence structures, vocabulary and recognition of major thought relationships in paragraphs, as well as practice in reading and writing academic English.

For students who failed to acquire essential skills in LC 6000, additional practice in the reading and writing skills and strategies will be provided. Students receive individualized attention to enhance their reading and writing skills for academic purposes.

Course contents and teaching activities focus on the integrated skills of listening, speaking, reading and writing with a particular emphasis on academic writing. Students will also work in small groups, practicing paper presentation techniques, precis writing, and research writing.

This course is intended to provide additional practice in the four skills – listening, speaking, reading and writing strategies covered in LC 4003. Students receive individualized attention to enhance their communication skills in English.

Basic Course
Plan 1 (1.1) and Plan 2 (2.1)

The course reviews/introduces mathematical concepts and techniques commonly used in economic analysis and the graduate theory courses.

Plan 2 (2.2)

The course offers fundamental approaches to explain rational decisions of economic agents. Economic analysis of consumer behavior and demand for goods, production theory and costs, market structure, and price determination mechanism are the core focus. Basic concepts in general equilibrium theory, welfare economics and market failure, and remedies mechanism are topics to be discussed.

This course aims to provide background on theoretical and empirical models in intermediate macroeconomics. The topics include: Static and dynamic form in real economic world, monetary and fiscal policies and basic growth theory.

The study of fundamental and advanced probability theory and probability distribution function in applied statistics. Moreover, the course covers an introduction to random variables, large sample theory, point estimation, interval estimation and hypothesis/hypotheses testing. A simple bivariate and multi-variate linear regression model is also introduced.

The course reviews/introduces mathematical concepts and techniques commonly used in economic analysis and the graduate theory courses.

Core Courses
Plan 2 (2.1) and Plan 2 (2.2)

Microeconomic theory with an emphasis on analysis of consumer behavior, theory of firm, decision making under uncertainty, perfect competition, monopoly and monopsony, and imperfect competition. Game theory will also be introduced.

Microeconomic theory with an mphasis on the basic topics of classical microeconomic theory including market equilibrium, individual decision making, traditional market failure, and general equilibrium theory.
Prerequisite: DE 8100 Microeconomic Theory I
The Dean may grant exemption for Prerequisites on case-by-case basis.

An introduction of the most relevant issues and developments of dynamic modern macroeconomics. Economies are therefore modeled as dynamic equilibrium systems based on inter-temporal decisions. This framework is then used to study growth, social security system, asset price behavior, and economic policy.

Advanced topics in Macroeconomics with emphasis on economic fluctuations. The competitive equilibrium business cycle and deviations from the competitive model are the main focus. Topics include consumption and investment theories, real business cycle theory, and new Keynesian theory.
Prerequisite: DE 8300 Macroeconomic Theory I
The Dean may grant exemption for Prerequisites on case-by-case basis.

Econometric methods for economic analysis. Topics include the theory and application of the LS and ML estimators of the linear single equation, and structural models for cross-sectional and panel data, specification analysis, and model choice issues and analysis of limited dependent variables.

Advanced topics in econometrics are examined. Topics include the recent development in time series econometrics, univariate time series models in both mean and variance, unit roots and co-integration, non-linear regression and regime-switching model.
Prerequisite: DE 8500 Econometrics I
The Dean may grant exemption for Prerequisites on case-by-case basis.

Elective Courses
Plan 2 (2.1) and Plan 2 (2.2)

An introduction to both theories and empirical issues on development economics. The course is also designed to encourage student to apply analytical tools in discussing current development topics. The topics include household decision problem, land and agriculture, risk and insurance, health and nutrition, education, wage and labor market, and behavioral economics.

Topics of development economics at both macro and micro levels. The course provides both theories and current empirical evidence on various aspects including microfinance, financial development and economic growth, social security system and population aging, institutional economics, as well as income inequality.

The theory and evidence concerning causes and consequences of international trade with attention focused on the interplay of economic theory and empirical descriptions of foreign trade and foreign direct investment. Topics include comparative advantage on the imperfectly competitive markets, income distribution and the gains from trade, and the impact of taxes, tariff, and subsidies on international trade.

Analysis of international capital markets, exchange rates, interest and prices. International monetary economics covering topics like exchange rate and balance of payment determination, speculative attacks and target zones, monetary approaches to the adjustment mechanism, portfolio and asset market approaches, monetary integration and policy coordination.

A synthesis of finance theory from the perspective of discrete and continuous-time analysis. It examines the microeconomic foundations of individual financial behavior, the financial market, and financial intermediation with some emphasis on risk and uncertainty. Topics include portfolio selection theory and investment decision, market signaling, market imperfection, capital pricing models, and arbitrage pricing. This course also covers basic corporate financial economics, mainly theory and empirical issues on the firm’s investment and financing decisions.

The modern asset pricing models are examined. The topics include the dynamic theories: Consumption Capital Asset Pricing Model (C-CAPM), term structure of interest rate and derivative pricing. Empirical evidences on asset pricing are also explored. The topics include: Predictability of asset returns, multi-factor models and behavioral finance.

Applications of theoretical and empirical economic tools to a number of environmental issues. The major objectives are for students to: (1) learn basic economic principles governing the allocation of various categories of scarce natural/environmental resources among competing uses; and (2) gain experience with basic analytical tools useful for applying these principles to real world allocation problems.

A comprehensive introduction to the economic valuation of environmental resources and policies. The course will cover both key elements of economic theory that are needed to understand the methodologies covered, and an introduction to the analysis of data. The methods covered are of direct relevance to policy formulation. Empirical issues on the use of environmental values are discussed.

Theory and evidence on the economic analysis of the public sector. The course focuses on the foundation of welfare economics, the role of government, and government taxation policy: what does government do and what are the effects of these actions. Topics include the impact of taxation on the allocation of resources and the distribution of income; tax incidence; efficiency of taxation; and optimal taxation.

The economic roles of government, the public expenditure theory, and how government policies affect social welfare will be examined. The course explores the general concept of public goods and the reasons that justify government provision, the roles of public policies such as income redistribution, taxes and subsidies, and government grants on the supply of public goods, as well as local government and the participatory development of local communities. The evaluation of public expenditure with reference to the Thai economy will be discussed.

Extension of the fundamental hypotheses in microeconomics of rational and consistency axioms in consumer’s preferences to the impact of psychology, individual’s attitude and mindset, as well as social contexts that influence people’s decision making. We take into account a larger set of preferences that include the endowment effect, loss aversion, framing and so forth. Some empirical evidences and experiments will be applied to illustrate people’s economic behavior in reality especially under the uncertain world.

Applications of advanced quantitative tools and computer packages for economic analysis and policy evaluation are introduced. Both quantitative theories and practical issues in empirical researches are discussed.

Application of economic approach to policy analysis are explored. Topics include; role of government, review of welfare economics and policy agenda, rules and institutions, legislators and politicians, benefit and cost of program, transaction cost, tax incentives, budget allocation and non-budgetary fund. Principal-agent model, Empirical data to observe behavioral change and Econometric Model for Policy Evaluation are also discussed.

Analysis of labor demand, labor supply, labor market equilibrium, labor market policy, human capital, and labor market dynamics. A great deal of emphasis will be placed on the analytical advances in modem labor economics that have had impacts on research in other fields within economics and in other disciplines.

Economic analysis of health care and health care reform with respect to allocation efficiency and equity. Topics include the economic determinants of health, market for medical care, insurance market, interaction between health and other markets, investment in health sector, and government regulation and public financing in health care.

The behavior of economic agent and the analysis of optimal decisions being dependent upon other agents’ actions. Various models of equilibrium are explored to capture various ways economic agents make their decisions under different games: static games, dynamic games, or games of incomplete information.

Students write a substantial research paper under supervision of a faculty member approved by Dean of School of Development Economics.

Topics not offered as a regular course but are of individual interests to students could be offered as a directed course under guidance of a faculty member.

Dissertation
Plan 2 (2.1)

Research in topics of interest under supervision of thesis advisor. The additional coursework may be required by recommendation of thesis advisor. Students are required to present thesis proposal, progress report and viva core.

Plan 1 (1.1) and Plan 2 (2.2)

Research in topics of interest under supervision of thesis advisor. The additional coursework may be required by recommendation of thesis advisor. Students are required to present thesis proposal, progress report and viva core.

Independent Studies
Master of Economics

Students develop research proposal and write a substantial research paper (or thesis) related to economic issues. The work shall be done under supervision of a faculty member approved by the Dean of School of Development Economics.

Learning Methodology

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Application Schedule as follows:

Plan A (2 (2.1)) Plan C (1 (1.1))
Date of Application Now to May 11, 2018 December 18, 2017 – May 11, 2018
Announcement for Interview Schedule for Admission May 16, 2018 May 16, 2018
Interview for Screening May 19 – 20, 2018 May 19 – 20, 2018
Result Announcement May 25, 2018 May 25, 2018
Receiving registration documents May 28 – 31, 2018 May 28 – 31, 2018
Registration May 28 – June 1, 2018 May 28 – June 1, 2018
Orientation June 9, 2018 June 9, 2018
Basic Course “(Refresher Course)
June 10 – August 5, 2018” “(Refresher Course)
June 10 – August 5, 2018”
Commencement date for study August 14, 2018 August 14, 2018

Inquiries

For more information, please contact the Graduate School of Development Economics, National Institute of Development Administration (NIDA), 118 Seri Thai Road, Klongchan, Bangkapi District, Bangkok 10240, THAILAND Tel. (+662) 727 3640

Information for Class Hours, Fees and Credits

1. Classes are normally held on Friday during 18.00 hrs. – 21.00 hrs., and on weekends during 9.00 hrs. – 16.00 hrs. Students are required to take three courses per semester; however, full time students may take up to four courses per semester.

2. Tuition fees are 6,000 THB/credit.
Registration fees are 4,000 THB.
Special Activity Fees are 20,000 THB/Semester.
Other expenses should be expected.
3. Total credit requirements are as follows:

Plan 1 (1.1) Plan 2 (2.1) Plan 2 (2.2)
– Course Work – 30 credits 42 credits

– Dissertation 48 credits 36 credits 48 credits

– Total 48 credits 66 credits 90 credits

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